Access an ESP32 camera module from the desktop

If you have a Raspberry Pi and wish to attach a camera to it there are a number of options available to you – including from the Raspberry Pi Foundation themselves – but if you wish to use one with RISC OS, your options are considerably more limited. So limited, in fact, that until very recently I don’t think there was a working option. As of mid-May, however, that changed thanks to Rick Murray.

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Snippets – 1st January, 2021

A final round up of 2020 news that hasn’t found its way to RISCOSitory before I was aiming to get this final round up of news posted on the last day of 2020, but as ever other things got in the way, so what was intended as the last post of 2020 has become the first post of 2021. Still, never mind, better late than never – which should probably be the official motto here in the RISCOSitory bunker!

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e-book reader open sourced

Something I managed to miss on RISCOSitory is that back in September, Rick Murray engaged in a little experimentation with e-books (books supplied in digital form for use on e-readers – which can be dedicated devices, or software running on phones, tablets, or normal computers). The result of his efforts, written up on his blog at the time, was an e-book reader application for RISC OS which he made available via !Store.

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Snippets – 31st December, 2019

With 2019 drawing to a close at the end of today, to be immediately followed by a year with the official designation of 2020, it’s time to round up a selection of news that hasn’t been covered on RISCOSitory over the course of the year.

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Snippets – 1st January, 2019

Although this is the first post for 2019, it’s also the last post of 2018! It’s once again time for a round up of new releases, updates, and so on, that have somehow not made it to these pages before, with a whole bunch of news snippets from 2018.

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Come on and play Koi-koi

It’s a carp-carp card game, doncherknow – but not a version of Go Fish! Rick Murray has released an implementation of a Japanese two-player card game, pitting you against the computer, called Koi-koi (or “come on”). The game is played with a deck Japanese playing cards called Hanafuda, which translates as flower cards, and the aim of the game is to accumulate matches, called Yaku. These are pairs of cards of the same suit, and when the game ends, the winner is the player with the most points derived from…

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