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Mar 052017
 

Insert witty comment about Witty Pi here. Um… that’ll do.

The next meeting of Bristol RISC OS Users (BRU) will take place on Wednesday, 8th March, at the Hope and Anchor pub in Bristol – and, as ever, anyone with an interest in RISC OS who is in the area is welcome to come along; there are no membership or entry fees.

Running from around 7:30pm until closing time, the meetings are generally informal in nature, and consist of a group of like-minded people meeting up for a chat over a pie1 and a pint2. Continue reading »

Oct 152016
 

Just the thing for the morning after the night before, and you’ve woken up wondering where on Earth you are!1

Chris Hall has released a new application, provisionally called ‘SatNav’, that can read the signal from a GPS receiver and feed it to other applications capable of understanding and acting on that data. One such application is Sine Nomine’s mapping software RiscOSM, which will then open a map showing your current location. Continue reading »

Apr 122018
 

It’s where the discerning RISC OS user will be on Saturday, 21st April.

It’s now only a little over a week until this year’s Wakefield Show takes place – so let’s take a quick look at what’s in store for you, the discerning RISC OS user in question.

Getting some important details out of the way first, the show will take place at its regular venue: Continue reading »

Jan 272018
 

Having been developing and showing off his SatNav application and RISC OS GPS device at recent shows, Chris Hall will be taking visitors off in a new direction at this year’s Southwest Show. The event takes place just four weeks from today, and as well as the GPS device Chris will be launching a new genealogy application, FamTree, which will be available to purchase for £15.00.

As its name suggests, the application builds and displays a family tree. However, rather than working from data previously entered into a rigidly structured database, it instead works from data stored in a more simple manner – the directory structure of your disc or other media. Starting at a directory you choose, it parses the structure below that, with each sub-directory representing a child, containing a number of relevant files and, of course, further sub-directories for subsequent generations.

Jan 132018
 

A round-up of 2017 news that could have been reported on at the time if people had only sent it this way!

With 2017 now behind us, looking back over the RISCOSitory posts for the year might leave people thinking there has been very little activity in the RISC OS world – but in fact it merely means there have been very few posts on the site over the course of the year. This, sadly, is a reflection of the amount of news submitted to RISCOSitory by developers etc, more than anything else, with their news being posted elsewhere.

So, over the last few weeks, I’ve been scouring forums and feeds that have gone unread due to a lack of spare time, and where something has jumped out at me as something I might have reported on, I’ve rounded it up in the snippets post below. Continue reading »

Dec 302017
 

The question on everyone’s lips for countless years to come will be “Where were you on 28th October, 2017?”

Okay, they probably won’t be asking that – but I’m asking it now.

Well? Where were you?

I’ll tell you where I was: Feltham. More specifically, the St Giles Hotel – in the conference rooms on the first floor, where this year’s London Show was held. If you weren’t there, I’ll assume you’re reading this because you have an interest in RISC OS, and would like to know what you missed. In which case, read on… Continue reading »

Dec 122017
 

Plus a new version of rRaw.

PhShpLyrs is an application from Anton Reiser that makes it possible to pull the image and individual layers from a Photoshop PSD file and save them as a RISC OS-native image format. There are some limitations as to the type of PSD file, but when such a file is loaded into the application it allows the main image and any layers to be saved as sprites (with a full alpha channel). It’s also possible to wrap all of the layers (though not the main image) into a Drawfile.

Anton also released an updated version of rRaw earlier this year. Version 0.04 of the application, which is able to read raw files from various digital cameras, benefits from a bug being addressed that affected some Nikon NEF 14-uncompressed files, and also gains some new features, such as the ability to export GPS geolocation data from the ‘About this image’ window.

Many thanks to Carlos Michael Santillán for giving providing me with a heads-up about these.

Oct 082017
 

So what’s in store for you lucky RISC OS users this year?

The Long Gap is the period between the annual Wakefield Show, which usually takes place in April, and the London Show, which takes place a whole six months later (that’s half a year, doncher know), towards the end of October.

It’s October now (and has been for a week and a day), which means the Long Gap is almost over, and the London Show is imminent – it takes place on Saturday the 28th – so it’s time to take a look at what’s in store for anyone making the trip and, hopefully, encourage those on the cusp of deciding whether to visit to make the right choice!

Continue reading »

Sep 172017
 

Seven months on? This must be some kind of a record!

The RISC OS Southwest Show this year took place on 25th February – so this show report sets quite a record for the time between the event and its appearance at just under seven months. Unfortunately, this is a reflection of the amount of time I’ve had available in that intervening period to sit down and write the report. Which is to say: very little.

To make matters slightly worse, I usually refer to the photos I’ve taken at the show as a means to remind myself of who was there, what they were demonstrating, and so on – and this year, I forgot to take my camera. I did take a few pictures with my phone, but I really don’t like my phone as a camera (it’s perfectly capable, it’s just the way it has to be held, etc.) and therefore only have a few pictures. Continue reading »