Sep 032018
 

The Centre for Computing History, a computing museum based in Cambridge, will be playing host to an event this coming weekend that should be of interest to any and all fans of Acorn Computers: Acorn World 2018.

Organised by the Acorn and BBC User Group (ABUG) in association with the museum, the event will run from 10:00am until 5:00pm on both Saturday the 8th and Sunday the 9th of September, and will offer an eye-popping range of hardware and software from both the Acorn and post-Acorn eras, with many of the computers on display running software for visitors to try out.

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Jun 062018
 

A new version of RPCEmu was pushed out early last month, featuring two significant changes leading to its version number jumping from 0.8.15 to 0.9.0. Those changes – for which test versions have been available for a while – are the shift from the Allegro 4 library to the Qt5 library (which enabled Chris Gransden to build a version that runs on RISC OS), and the threading model now sees the GUI on a different thread to the actual machine emulation.

RPCEmu can be run on a number of platforms, and its aim is to emulate the hardware of a RiscPC, allowing suitable versions of RISC OS to be used on those platforms.

Oct 272016
 

Andy Marks has posted a sneak peak picture to the RISCOSBits Twitter account, along with the hashtag #neverbeforeseen – but what the picture clearly shows is the box that the humble Raspberry Pi is usually supplied in, which is something that just about everyone interested in these things has seen. The picture, he says, is only a clue, and this is something else for the London Show on Saturday. So what gives?

The answer is probably a hitherto unannounced product called the PiPOD – a means to allow the Raspberry Pi to be mounted in a podule slot in either a RiscPC or A7000, with both the old and new systems able to be run simultaneously, with one running in a window on the other – presumably using VNC.

Aug 292014
 

Yet more attention for the RiscPC, which really only wanted to celebrate quietly, with family and close friends.

With the RiscPC having celebrated its 20th birthday earlier this year, the next meeting of the Wakefield RISC OS Computer Club will feature Peter Richmond taking a look back at some of the hardware expansion options that have been available in that time for Acorn’s iconic and most powerful computer. Continue reading »

Apr 232014
 

Announcement from Andrew Rawnsley, 23rd April, 2014.

With the RiscPC now being 20 years old, we thought it would be nice to run a bit of a fun offer with this in mind.

Our RISCube range of computers – details (somewhat out-of-date, due to not having enough hours in the day) at www.riscube.co.uk – make excellent RiscPC replacements due to almost 100% software compatibility. Continue reading »

Apr 152014
 

And, for many people, you’re still going strong.

The RiscPC was the most powerful computer Acorn ever put into production, and it was officially launched twenty years ago today, on Friday, 15th April, 1994. according to Acorn’s April 1994 Developers’ Newsletter and the date of their announcement on usenet. RISCOSitory takes a look back over its twenty year (so far) life. Continue reading »

Apr 102014
 

Announcement from Andrew Rawnsley, 10th April, 2014.

April 15th represents the 20th birthday of Acorn’s RiscPC computer, launched back in 19941. The RiscPC was an iconic machine for all of us, and was ultimately the pinnacle of Acorn’s computer technology, surpassed only by the unreleased Phoebe. Continue reading »

Jun 252011
 

Peter Nowasad of Qubit Consultancy Ltd has announced the availability of version 2.1 of Charm, described as a free, simple to learn yet powerful high level language with a compiler that generates efficient code with a small memory footprint. Aimed in particular at the RiscPC or an emulator such as RPCEmu, the software comes with a desktop shell that supports easy editing, compiling, assembling and linking of multiple files, and allows a number of configuration options for the utilities to be set through menus.

The Charm source code itself is supplied under the GNU General Public Licence v3, and Peter would like to hear from anyone who interested in collaborating with him on developing the language further, as well as from those who have used Charm to develop anything, and who would like to have their software hosted alongside the language itself.

Demonstration programs written in the language can also be found on the Charm website, along with a support forum.