Search Results : raspberry pi 3 » RISCOSitory

Mar 152018
 

Yesterday was Pi Day, a name reflecting that if you write your dates in either Overpuddlian form (mm-dd-yyyy) or as specified by ISO 8601 (yyyy-mm-dd) – in both cases ignoring the year – you get 3-14, which sort of looks like Pi to two decimal places if you squint a bit so that the dash looks like a decimal point. A fitting day, then, for the Raspberry Pi Foundation to release another version of its credit card-sized computer: A ‘+’ version of the Raspberry Pi 3 model B.

The most notable change for day to day use are that while the Pi 3B+ sports the same processor as the Pi 3, the ARM Cortex-A53, it’s running at a higher speed – 1.4GHz rather than 1.2GHz. Another notable change is that it also features Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0,  compared with the previous 100 megabit, support for power over ethernet (via a separate HAT device). Hopefully, RISC OS will soon be updated so that it can be used on the new Pi.

Jun 112016
 

PackMan iconAlan Buckley has released a new version of PackMan, a package manager designed to work with packages distributed via the RISC OS Packaging Project. The main reason for the update is compatibility with the Raspberry Pi 3 – although an existing bug has also been squashed, whereby it wasn’t possible to exit the application when first run without installing the ‘Packages’ directory. Continue reading »

Aug 142018
 

A brand new version of an old game has made its way to !Store, where it can be downloaded free of charge, thanks to the efforts of Jeroen Vermeulen.

Originally published as a type-in listing in volume 8, issue 1 of The Micro User, which hit newsagents’ shelves in 1990, Dickie Brickie was written by Mike Goldberg – one of six that he had published in the magazine. Twenty eight years on, Jeroen has released a RISC OS remake of the game, written using the AMCOG Development Kit by Tony Bartram – and Tony himself helped out by dealing with the sound conversion.

Continue reading »
May 072018
 

There will probably be flashing – but don’t worry, it’ll be LEDs rather than Andrew himself.

The next meeting of the RISC OS User Group of London – ROUGOL – will take place two weeks today, on 21st May, and the guest speaker will be Andrew Conroy.

Although Andrew will be recognised by many people as one of the faces of CJE Micro’s, regularly in attendance as one of the team at RISC OS shows, he also uses RISC OS in his spare time – and his talk in London will centre around one aspect of that: Raspberry Pi interfacing projects, for which he uses BBC BASIC. Continue reading »

Apr 172018
 

Or whisper. It’s your choice, and under your control!

Jon Abbott, taking a break from making old games work via ADFFS as part of the Archimedes Software Preservation Project, has released a new version of pi-topUtils. The software provides things like a battery level indicator, screen dimming (which helps preserve battery life), automatic shutdown, and so on.

The new version – 1.04, which is for the original pi-top only, not the pi-top2 – adds support for (and control of) the speaker in the Raspberry Pi-based laptop, initialising them and allowing the volume to be adjusted via the mute and volume up/down keys on the pi-top keyboard.

Jan 132018
 

A round-up of 2017 news that could have been reported on at the time if people had only sent it this way!

With 2017 now behind us, looking back over the RISCOSitory posts for the year might leave people thinking there has been very little activity in the RISC OS world – but in fact it merely means there have been very few posts on the site over the course of the year. This, sadly, is a reflection of the amount of news submitted to RISCOSitory by developers etc, more than anything else, with their news being posted elsewhere.

So, over the last few weeks, I’ve been scouring forums and feeds that have gone unread due to a lack of spare time, and where something has jumped out at me as something I might have reported on, I’ve rounded it up in the snippets post below. Continue reading »

Dec 022017
 

If you are designing or developing a piece of hardware and need to use a microcontroller, you will need a way to program it. There are many tools to do this available for other platforms (x86 in particular) – but there is also a solution for RISC OS users in the form of Rob Sprowson’s PIC suite.

PIC Suite is a set of applications that make it possible to develop for Microchip’s range of 8-bit PIC microcontrollers, and it has reached its 20th birthday. To coincide with this, Rob has just released an update for the suite, adding a greater range of supported devices, which now stands at 110. Continue reading »

Oct 302017
 

The Wakefield RISC OS Computer Club will next meet on Wednesday, 1st November, at 7:45pm, when Ruth Gunstone will be the group’s speaker, covering the use of a Raspberry Pi as a Network Attached Storage device, and as a media player. The meeting is free for members, and a mere £3.00 for guests, and takes place at:

West Yorkshire Sports and Social Club,
Sandal Hall Close,
Off Walton Lane,
Wakefield,
West Yorkshire,
WF2 6ER.