VinceH

VinceH, aka Vince M Hudd, owns and operates Soft Rock Software, providing services and software to not only the RISC OS market, but also to the wider world. RISCOSitory and its associated sites and services are provided for free as a result of that - so buying his stuff is probably quite helpful.

Dec 152018
 

That’s last year’s record for a long-delayed show report broken!

This year’s Wakefield Show took place on 21st April, at the Cedar Court Hotel, organised by the local user group – the Wakefield RISC OS Computer Club (WROCC).

Like last year, I must apologise for another long-delayed RISCOSitory show report. As ever, this is mainly because of how busy I am outside the world of RISC OS, but also because I wanted to edit down my video recordings of the theatre talks to a more manageable length – and video editing can take a lot of time.

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Dec 132018
 

The next meeting of the RISC OS User Group of London will take place on Monday, 17th December – but rather than a normal meeting, with a guest speaker, this last meeting before Christmas has instead been scheduled as the group’s informal Christmas Meal.

This is because the normal venue for ROUGOL’s meetings, the upstairs restaurant in the Blue-Eyed Maid, tends to be in high demand at this time of year. Therefore, the group may have to meet downstairs, in the bar – making it an ideal opportunity for those attending to discuss what has happened in the RISC OS World over the course of 2018, as well as what they hope and expect to happen in the coming year.

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Dec 122018
 

Or at least very (a)corny ones.

Kevin Wells has released another application that makes use of Wget to act as an interface between the RISC OS user and a remote website.

Called DadJokes, the purpose of the software this time isn’t to perform a useful service, but instead to do something much better – display a random, and usually very corny joke.

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Nov 302018
 

A portent of coming… increased functionality!

A new version of Prophet is now available.

The software is a comprehensive business accounts package, with features that compare well to those found on much more expensive accounts packages on other platforms. It was originally written by Quentin Pain and sold through Apricote Studios (now Accountz), and as of earlier this year it is being looked after by Rob Sprowson and sold through Elesar Ltd.

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Nov 272018
 

Kevin Wells has released another update to his TrainTimes application, which uses Wget to display information about trains due at any given UK railway station via the TransportAPI website, and thence about those trains themselves.

The update to version 1.06 contains a few small fixes. Firstly, When the number of trains due is either ten or twenty, there is now no button for the next pageful after the last ten. Secondly, there is now an hourglass displayed when timetables are loaded. In addition there are a couple of spelling and wording corrections.

Kevin has also uploaded a short video showing the application in use.

Nov 202018
 

Kevin Wells has released another update to his TrainTimes application. The software, which uses Wget to interrogate the Transport API site, presents the user about trains due at a chosen station.

Clicking on a button for any of those trains will reveal stations and times for that train’s route – and the new feature in version 1.05 is that it is now possible to click on any of those stations to view the times of trains due there.

Nov 132018
 

The Midlands User Group (MUG) will next meet on Saturday, 17th November, and their guest speaker will be Tony Bartram of AMCOG Games.

Tony only became a RISC OS user a few years ago, released his first game for the platform in 2015. Since then he has built up quite a catalogue of titles, covering several different genres, with the latest addition being a top-down racing game called Stunt Drivers.

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Nov 112018
 

It’s a carp-carp card game, doncherknow – but not a version of Go Fish!

Rick Murray has released an implementation of a Japanese two-player card game, pitting you against the computer, called Koi-koi (or “come on”).

The game is played with a deck Japanese playing cards called Hanafuda, which translates as flower cards, and the aim of the game is to accumulate matches, called Yaku. These are pairs of cards of the same suit, and when the game ends, the winner is the player with the most points derived from those pairs.

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