What do you get if you cross a two headed Titanium with 256 colours?

An extra wide, 256 colour display! With two DVI-I sockets on board, one of the selling points of Elesar‘s Titanium is the ability to drive two displays side by side. RISC OS doesn’t (properly) support this, but it can be done by fooling the operating system into treating the two screens as though they are one. The software to do this has been available since February 2016. Much more recently, an updated ROM image was released in July of this year that allowed the board to use 256 colour screen…

News nybble: Titanium gets a speed boost

Elesar Ltd has released an update for Titanium users that will afford their computers a bit of a boost. The company found that there was a difference in what the datasheet for the system’s processor and the processor itself think are in some clock registers. Armed with this knowledge, although the processor core still runs at 1500MHz, it has been possible to speed up an internal bus by 100% – doubling the speed of data being transferred over that bus. The update is free to all existing Titanium owners, by…

Show report: Southwest 2017

Seven months on? This must be some kind of a record! The RISC OS Southwest Show this year took place on 25th February – so this show report sets quite a record for the time between the event and its appearance at just under seven months. Unfortunately, this is a reflection of the amount of time I’ve had available in that intervening period to sit down and write the report. Which is to say: very little. To make matters slightly worse, I usually refer to the photos I’ve taken at…

R-Comp Interactive puts Titanium into Beeblebrox mode

If it supports two heads, does that mean it’ll soon support three ARMs?1 Users of R-Comp‘s TiMachine computer – and those who are subscribed to their support scheme for Elesar‘s Titanium – can now make use of the two DVI-I outputs found on the motherboard. The company has released DualHead, which makes it easy to drive two separate monitors from the board.

RISC OS Awards 2016 results

The RISC OS Awards poll for 2016 was brought to a close on 29th February. As before, the results were processed and counted on a RISC OS computer (using a home-brewed program to turn the votes into a file for each category, ready to be loaded into Fireworkz), and initially announced on the @RISCOSitory Twitter feed. Those results are now online on the RISC OS Awards website and the various winners have been notified – where possible – by email.

Snippets – 9th January, 2022

A roundup of 2021 news and releases not already covered on RISCOSitory With 2021 now behind us, the time has come for one final round up of news that hasn’t already found its way onto onto these pages – although this time, in fact, it’s the only round up of such news for 2021; for 2020, a snippets post appeared half way through the year and then another just after the year ended – but no earlier post has been compiled for 2021.

RISCOSbits would like to welcome you to join them for Stonking Saturday!

(Oh, and by the way, there’s a new RISC OS system available for that day only!) If you’re a bit fed up with those pesky Overpuddlians bringing their practices and other atrocities over here, such as the increasingly common use of ‘invite’ as a noun, or annual sales events like ‘Black Friday’ (which tend to last longer than that one day) – and even worse, certain operating systems, when we have a rather nice (if slightly flawed) home grown one that runs on a family of processors which also began…

RISCOSbits squeezes out some Linuxbits

And pumps out a PiAno, and a Pi 4 upgrade scheme. A number of systems on which RISC OS can be run also have Linux distros available for them, which means it’s very easy for RISC OS users to have a hardware platform for running our operating system natively, and a hardware platform for running a more widely supported OS – while only having a single hardware platform on the desk. With the Raspberry Pi, for example, it’s just a matter of changing the SD card to the OS you…