Aug 142018
 

A round-up of news items found anywhere but the RISCOSitory news submission address!

With time rarely being on my side, I’m always glad when people who release software or other resources for RISC OS, or who do anything else relevant to the platform let me know about it by sending their news to the email address made available for the purpose.

However, there are still plenty who don’t send me their announcements, and that is the purpose of these ‘Snippets’ posts – so what follows is the result of me attempting to catch up on my reading of RISC OS-related newsgroups, mailing lists, and other online fora.

Continue reading »
Jun 062018
 

A new version of RPCEmu was pushed out early last month, featuring two significant changes leading to its version number jumping from 0.8.15 to 0.9.0. Those changes – for which test versions have been available for a while – are the shift from the Allegro 4 library to the Qt5 library (which enabled Chris Gransden to build a version that runs on RISC OS), and the threading model now sees the GUI on a different thread to the actual machine emulation.

RPCEmu can be run on a number of platforms, and its aim is to emulate the hardware of a RiscPC, allowing suitable versions of RISC OS to be used on those platforms.

Jun 052018
 

RISC OS is so intuitive to use its User Guide is how big?

RISC OS 5 User Guide front cover, courtesy of RISC OS Open LtdA new version of the User Guide has been published by RISC OS Open Ltd – the first printed edition since Acorn’s last one in 1996, and one that is bang up to date with the latest stable release of RISC OS, version 5.24 released in April.

The new tome is a mighty one, with a total of sixty two chapters and eight appendices, all of which span a total of 616 pages, and it features over nine hundred images to illustrate the text and make it easier to digest. Continue reading »

Apr 272018
 

No, wait, that’s 2.05, a version number – not 2:05, a time!

Chris Johnson has – apparently belatedly – announced the release of CPUClock (mirror) version 2.05, an small application that can display the speed and temperature of the CPU, as well as offer some control, such as reducing the clock speed if the temperature reaches a trigger value. According to Chris, the core functionality hasn’t changed in the new version, but it benefits from the availability of more details on the CPU status, and any control of its speed.

Note that the software is only of use on modern hardware, which provides the facilities to read and set the speed, and read the temperature – that means platforms such as the BeagleBoard, Pandaboard, IGEPv5, Titanium, and Raspberry Pi.  Neither older hardware nor emulated solutions are supported.

Apr 212017
 
An epic amount of storage on RISC OS

An epic amount of storage on RISC OS

RISC OS Open Ltd promised us an epic announcement at Wakefield – and this might just be it: The company will be demonstrating “previously unheard of amounts of storage on RISC OS” with a 2TB – that’s two TERRABYTES – drive attached directly to a disc controller on a RISC OS computer, in native Acorn FileCore format.

An image of a RISC OS machine with a ‘Gargantuan’ hard drive was posted by Rob Sprowson to Twitter earlier this week (with the image stolen and included here), though at the time he denied that it could be called epic.

Apr 212017
 

RISC OS Open Ltd have sneakily released a new RISC OS release candidate for the Raspberry Pi – if it can be called sneakily when they said at the recent Southwest Show (see Rob Sprowson’s talk) that it was coming soon. RC15 can be found on their Raspberry Pi downloads page, with full details on their news page.

As stated in the Southwest Show presentation, the new release candidate supports all models of Raspberry Pi, from the oldest to the newest, and from the smallest to the… well, standard sized. And as well as supporting all of the models of Pi, it benefits from all the recent improvements to RISC OS, such as the updated JPEG support, EDID monitor detection, and so on.

And if you come along to tomorrow’s Wakefield Show, you can purchase a copy of RC15 already on a ROOL-branded SD card for a mere £10 + VAT!

Mar 142017
 

Note: Being in the Midlands is not a compilation prerequisite!

The Midlands User Group‘s next meeting takes place from 2:00pm on Saturday, 18th March, and the guest speaker this month will be Chris Hall, who will be showing MUG members how to use RISC OS Open‘s Desktop Development Environment to build their own RISC OS ROM image – as well as touching on other uses for the software suite. The place to be is:

The Methodist Church Hall,
Greenhill,
Blackwell,
Bromsgrove,
B60 1BL.

There is a small entrance fee to cover costs, and refreshments will be available.

Mar 142017
 

The next monthly meeting of Cheshire-based RONWUG takes place tomorrow evening – Wednesday 15th March. Organised by Steve Potts, the meeting kicks off at around 7:30pm, and is open to anyone with an interest in RISC OS – and there are no membership or entrance fees. So, if you’re in the area tomorrow evening, the place to be is:

Trafford Metrovick Rugby and Cricket Club,
Finnybank Road,
Sale,
Cheshire,
M33 6LR.
Jan 162017
 

Techwriter and Easiwriter will be the subject of the next Midlands User Group meeting, with John McCartney providing hints, tips and demonstrations of both packages in use. The meeting takes place at 2:00pm on Saturday, 21st January, at:

The Methodist Church Hall,
Greenhill,
Blackwell,
Bromsgrove,
B60 1BL.

There is a small entrance fee payable, which covers the cost of the hall, and refreshments will be available.