Oct 292018
 

Courtesy of Leo White, the five talks from the RISC OS London Show 2018 are now available to watch on YouTube. So, in the order they were listed on the show programme, here they are:

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Oct 262018
 

As everyone in RISC OS land should know by now, this year’s London Show will take place tomorrow at the St Giles Hotel in Feltham. With my exhibitor hat on, I get very busy in the run up to a show – and I also deal with trying to get any last minute news posted here before the show takes place.

But, as ever, it depends largely on the news being sent to me in the first place – not all of it is. With that in mind, I’ve done a quick scan of the comp.sys.acorn.announce usenet group, and the most recent posts on the RISC OS Open Ltd (ROOL) forums, to see if there is anything else to mention. And there is…

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Oct 262018
 

R-Comp will be bringing a new version of PiFi to the London Show, which takes place tomorrow. The software allows you to re-purpose a spare WiFi-enabled Raspberry Pi as an adapter for a RISC OS computer – or, if connected to a hub, a number of systems. The headline feature of version 3 of the software is that it now includes software that runs in the RISC OS desktop to configure the Pi, rather than having to do it via NetSurf.

Available for £29.99 at the show, PiFi 3 is supplied as a micro-SD card ready for use in a Pi – all you need to find is a spare one to use for the purpose!

Oct 252018
 

Having first demonstrated it at this year’s Southwest Show, R-Comp Interactive has now released an upgrade to allow computers based around the i.MX6 CPU/GPU to benefit from hardware graphics acceleration. With it running, scrolling through documents is much faster, redraw is greatly improved when moving windows around, and so on.

Priced at £29.99, the upgrade is available via !Store (look for “ARMX6 Turbo Graphics”) or, if you’d prefer, get in touch with R-Comp on 01925 755 043 to  purchase it over the phone, in which case the (quite small) module will be sent to you by email.

Aug 172018
 

Both small, but still visible without the use of a magnifying glass!

The mini.m computer - R-Comp's new tiny toy

This year’s Wakefield show (report coming to be started soon at some point) saw the launch of a new computer from R-Comp, called the mini.m. The system is most easily described as a mini version of the ARMSX ARMX6, squeezed down so that it fits in a cube measuring just two inches in each dimension.

But what if you weren’t at Wakefield, and want to see this computer with your own eyes? Your best bet is to hope someone brings one along to your local user group meeting – so if your local user group is the RISC OS User Group of London, you’ll be in luck on Monday, 20th August, because the mini.m is just one of the things that will feature at the group’s meeting that evening.

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Jul 292018
 

That’s apparently pronounced “minim” which means I can’t make any Mini Me references. Um… like that one.

Shortly before this year’s Wakefield Show, R-Comp teased us with the news that they had a small surprise in store for visitors to the show, which visitors soon discovered was a new, small computer – the mini.m.  Based around the same processor as the ARMSX ARMX6, a quad-core Freescale i.MX6, the mini.m is for all intents and purposes a smaller version of the established machine – with some obvious differences due to its small size.

Just how small is it? The computer is housed in a cube-shaped case measuring just two inches in each dimension – a very small, incredibly convenient piece of kit that can be placed in a discreet location on your desk without taking up a lot of space. Continue reading »

May 232018
 

Many RISC OS users will have noticed an email or two arriving lately from RISC OS companies about personal data, privacy, and communications. Those emails almost certainly mention something called GDPR – the General Data Protection Regulation – which comes into force on Friday, 25th May, 2018 – the day after tomorrow.

Without going into any depth, the GDPR sets a new standard for protecting personal data, and giving control of that data to the people who actually own it – the people the data is about, such as you, or me. The general crux of those emails, therefore, is to tell you how the companies that sent them handle the information they hold about you. They may also seek your permission to communicate with you about products, promotions, special offers, and so on – and possibly even give you the option to be forgotten about. Continue reading »