Feb 162015
 

First notable example of ARMX6 development benefiting other hardware.

R-Comp have released an upgraded operating system for users of their PandaBoard-based ARMiniX computers, and for PandaBoard users who are subscribed to their PandaLand support scheme. Released just a week before the Southwest Show, at which R-Comp will be officially launching their new i.MX 6-based ARMSX ARMX6 computer, the update appears to largely be a result of work done for the new machine. Continue reading »

 February 16, 2015  Posted by  Software Tagged with: , , , ,
Mar 282014
 

Announcement from Andrew Rawnsley, 27th March, 2014.

R-Comp Interactive are pleased to announce the release of OS Update 4 for ARMiniX and PandaLand members.

The new OS update brings owners of ARMiniX computers up to date with the latest RISC OS features and functionality, whilst ensuring the reliability and stability that allowed ARMiniX to win “Best hardware” in the recent RISC OS awards. Continue reading »

 March 28, 2014  Posted by  Announcements Tagged with: , , , ,
Sep 252013
 

Three! Count ’em! And new micro-SD cards, too!

Just prior to the Midlands Show, R-Comp announced that “Super Pack 6” was available for owners of the original ARMini computer, as well as BeagleBoard users who have subscribed to the BeagleBoard Support Scheme, shortly followed by the option to upgrade to 16/32GB micro-SD cards. Later in the same month, the second OS upgrade for members of R-Comp’s PiPlus scheme was made available, that being a similar arrangement as the BeagleBoard Support Scheme, but for Raspberry Pi owners. And, not leaving out the PandaBoard, earlier this month the company released an OS update for users of the ARMiniX computer, and members of the PandaLand scheme. Continue reading »

 September 25, 2013  Posted by  Software Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Sep 082012
 

Make your 32-bit computer do an Impression (ho-ho) of a 26-bit one!

When Castle Technology Ltd launched the IYONIX pc, back in 2002, there was a significant question users needed an answer to before upgrading to the new computer: Would their old software run on the new hardware?

The problem was that for all the previous RISC OS computers, the ARM CPUs worked in (or supported in the case of StrongARM) an addressing mode we refer to as ’26-bit’, in which the program counter and processor status flags are contained in a single register; six bits are used for the status flags, and 26 bits for the program counter – the pointer to where in memory instructions are read for execution. With instructions always being word-aligned, rather than byte-aligned, the 26-bit program counter actually provides a 28-bit address range, representing bits 2 to 27 in the actual address – the lower two bits pointing to the instruction to be read are always zero. Continue reading »

May 212012
 

Everything for one panda!

R-Comp, who last year brought out the ARMini computer, based around a BeagleBoard-xM and subsequently launched a software support scheme for BeagleBoard owners wishing to run RISC OS on their devices, have now produced a similar scheme for PandaBoard owners – with the potentially puntastic name of PandaLand!

The new scheme is intended to provide PandaBoard owners with software and operating system components with a degree of support – something that isn’t really there if you opt for the DIY approach of performing a self-install of RISC OS from the components available on the RISC OS Open website – and includes several hundred megabytes of software, and should therefore make using RISC OS on the PandaBoard something of a doddle, particularly the initial set up. Continue reading »

 May 21, 2012  Posted by  News, Software Tagged with: , ,
Mar 242012
 

It’s been a busy month again here, which means there have been no posts to RISCOSitory for a while – so here’s a quick round-up of recent goings on in the world of RISC OS.

RISC OS 5.18

RISC OS 5 has seen its latest ‘stable’ release in the form of RISC OS 5.18, which features some 340 improvements since the last such release (version 5.16). The full list of improvements can be found on the RISC OS Open website, but this list isn’t written in ‘typical user-speak’. In response to requests for a more user friendly list, Rob Sprowson posted one to usenet, which Steve Revill has since posted on the RISC OS open forum. Continue reading »