Oct 262018
 

4D has announced a new IDE interface podule suitable for the Acorn-era hardware, providing a 40/44pin connection for rotating drives or, with a suitable adapter or interface, compact flash or SD cards. Called ZIDEFS, the podule’s features include support for up to four partitions, multiple podules (up to 3), Master and Slave drives, and more.

ZIDEFS comes in several versions: IDE podule with 40 and 44pin male connectors, priced at £89.00; IDE podule with 40pin male and 44pin female connectors, £99.00; IDE podule with CF adapter and 2GB CF (as 4x512MB partitions), £149.00; IDE podule with SD adapter and a 32GB SD card, £149.00.

Oct 262018
 

4D – the entity that shares space in the TARDIS with CJE Micro’s – is now offering 7″ and 10.” LCD monitors that feature multiple inputs, including HDMI, making them suitable for use in tight spots with small computers such as the Raspberry Pi. The combination of such a monitor, a Pi, and a small keyboard and mouse could also serve as a “portable desktop” computer.

The 7″ monitor sports HDMI, VGA and 1V composite inputs. It features a native resolution of 1024×600, and is priced at £59 including UK postage. Meanwhile, the 10.1″ one has the same inputs, with the addition of USB, and its resolution is 1280×800. It is priced at £99.00 including UK postage.

Oct 252018
 

CJE Micro’s and 4D will once again be exhibiting at the London Show and expect to have plenty of goodies on display, such as small HDMI monitors, the pi-topRO 2 Pi-based laptop, the 4D/Simon Inns Econet Clock, and a new IDE Podule (details of which to be announced RSN), and much more.

However, the company will be getting to the show by car, which means there will be limited available space to carry stock – so if you have anything specific you wish to buy from them at the show, please give them a call on 01903 523 222 before Friday lunchtime.

Sep 092018
 

In a situation that could have brought the economy stumbling to its knees, for a while there were no Econet Clocks in stock at 4D, having sold the last of the existing i-Cubed stock some time ago. However, the company is pleased to report that there is now a batch of new devices in stock and available to buy.

Continue reading »
Oct 272017
 

Start practising your squinting – they have small things. Chris will probably hold them up in the theatre for the audience to struggle to see.

There will be a wide range of goodies from the little shop with a lot of stock at the London Show tomorrow, with the usual CJE Micro’s and 4D presence. Amongst other things, there will be a selection of models from their RapidO range – but due to limited space in their vehicle (the TARDIS must be in for a service) Chris Evans asks that if there is something specific you want, please give them a call on  01903 523 222 by lunchtime today.

Particularly noteworthy is that the company hopes to be able to launch “another new significant RISC OS hardware system” – they’ve provided no firm details of what this is but say that whether this happens is subject to a key item being delivered on time, and suggest paying a visit to their stand to find out if it did and if it “is fully RISC OS compatible.”

Aug 142017
 

SmallyMouse2 logoModern RISC OS systems tend to come equipped with a number of USB ports, one of which is normally used to connect the mouse to the computer.

However, this wasn’t always the case – USB was first introduced in the mid-1990s, and the Acorn Archimedes first appeared in 1987; Acorn didn’t have the option of USB, and instead designed the Archimedes, RiscPC, and all the variants, to use a quadrature mouse.

The BBC Micro, of course, is an older computer again and in its case, if you had a mouse, it was probably connected via the user port. Continue reading »

Jul 302017
 

I had no idea computers contained fat or sugar – but this one definitely doesn’t!

RaspberryRO Lite case

RaspberryRO Lite case

Putting on his 4D hat, Chris Evans has introduced a new computer in the RaspberryRO range, this one given the ‘Lite’ suffix.

The RaspberryRO Lite takes the form of a Raspberry Pi (but you probably guessed that from the name) in a ‘nano’ desktop case, Continue reading »