Aug 172012
 

Not a hack, but a tool for hackers – and sometimes the hacked off

Reporter is an application by Martin Avison that provides a way for Wimp applications (especially those written in BASIC), Obey files, assembler programs, and so on, to easily display text and variable values in a debugging window, and as such can be a very useful tool for programmers – and it can also be used to help diagnose other problems, reporting on what’s happening during the boot process, for example.

Version 2.67 is now available from the Avisoft website, which includes the following changes since version 2.66: Continue reading »

 August 17, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: , ,
Aug 172012
 

IF LEN(string$)>255 THEN don’t be left stranded

Last month, Steve Drain announced the release of version 1.50 beta of Basalt, his module that provides extra features to BBC BASIC V. This version provides support for long strings, which Steve refers to as ‘strands’. There is also a comprehensive StrongHelp manual, but as yet there isn’t an online HTML version available.

Briefly explaining strands, Steve says: Continue reading »

 August 17, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: , , ,
Jun 232012
 

Module now ARMv7 compatible. Sorted!

ArmSort is a relocatable module from Martin Avison of Avisoft, designed to provide programmers using BBC BASIC on RISC OS computers and emulators with a very easy and fast way to sort arrays. The module can handle any number of single or multi-dimension arrays, in any combination of variable type, and with any key sequence. It features flexible parameters and comprehensive error checking, and – important for BASIC programmers – it’s fast, using the Flash and Shell sorting algorithms.

The update to version 4.08 is the first in over four years, and chief amongst the changes are that it is now ARMv7 compatible, running with alignment exceptions on – and is thus now fully compatible with the BeagleBoard, and the BeagleBoard-xM based ARMini computer. Continue reading »

 June 23, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: ,
Jun 102012
 

There’s a new version of Charm, Ee i ee I/O

Peter Nowosad of Qubit Consultancy Ltd has announced the availability of version 2.5.6 of Charm, his high level programming language for RISC OS computers.

Released under the terms of the GNU GPLv3 licence, Charm comes with a compiler that generates efficient code with a small memory footprint, and a desktop shell that supports easy editing, compiling, assembling or linking of multiple files. Charm is described as “a simple to learn yet powerful object oriented high level language.”

The latest update introduces new dynamic I/O libraries, and the language gains both static and dynamic constructors and destructors, which can be used to create and remove objects respectively, setting things up and cleaning things up as appropriate.

 June 10, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: , ,
Jun 022012
 

Beta Basalt for a better BASIC.

Steve Drain, developer of Basalt, has released a new version of the module. Short for BASIC Alternative keywords, Basalt is a module that adds many additional keywords and features to all versions of BBC BASIC V, the built in programming language included as part of the ROM (or ROM Image) in all versions RISC OS.

Version 1.42 beta is intended as a stable – with a bracketed question mark in Steve’s announcement – version of the previous alpha version, with additional features: Continue reading »

 June 2, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: ,
May 202012
 

A sunbeam to warm you, a new keyword to charm you.

Peter Nowosad of Qubit Consultancy Ltd has announced the availability of version 2.5.5 of Charm, his programming language for RISC OS computers.

With a compiler that generates efficient code with a small memory footprint, and a desktop shell that supports easy editing, compiling, assembling or linking of multiple files, Charm is described as “a simple to learn yet powerful object oriented high level language.” Continue reading »

 May 20, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: , ,
May 122012
 

Absoluately fabuluas.

RiscLua is a dialect of Lua adapted for use on RISC OS computer systems, and its maintainer, Gavin Wraith, has reorganised the download page on the RiscLua website, and added a handy new application for developers using the language.

The download page now has the distribution split into separate, smaller zip files containing RiscLua itself, example programs, utilities, the source code and the StrongHelp manual – and the new application, called Absolua.

Continue reading »

 May 12, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with:
Apr 152012
 

Gavin Wraith has been in touch with a little information about RiscLua, a version of the Lua programming language adapted for RISC OS computer systems, and further developed over the last ten years. It seems that RiscLua was updated to version 5.40 in November 2011, a piece of news that was overlooked on this site.

Gavin explains further: Continue reading »

 April 15, 2012  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: ,
Dec 242011
 

Steve Drain has released a number of BASIC libraries, and a new version of the Basalt module.

The Strings BASIC library provides routines for handling long strings, referenced by normal string variables. All the standard string keywords are emulated and work with any combination of normal string variables and expressions and long strings. Written to explore a new idea for providing long string support in Basalt, which is yet to be fully written, Steve is releasing the library because it may be of interest. Continue reading »

 December 24, 2011  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: , ,
Nov 262011
 

Call is a newly released (beta) module by Steve Drain, designed to send WIMP messages to an application – and therefore allowing the application to carry out specific functions – after a set period, or at regular intervals.

The RISC OS timing system and call-back mechanism is normally used by way of two SWIs (software interrupts): OS_CallAfter and OS_CallEvery, which are used to set up an interval and point to an address in memory; if OS_CallAfter was used, then after the interval has passed, the code at the specified address is called, and if OS_CallEvery was used, then the code is called regularly, at the specified interval. Continue reading »

 November 26, 2011  Posted by  Programming Tagged with: ,